hidrocolonterapia, hidroterapia de colon, colonterapia , terapia colonica, limpieza colon, limpieza intestinal, irrigacion colonica,  intestino grueso, delgado, sobrecarga toxica, autointoxicacion, higiene, estreñimiento, diarrea cronica, gastritis, colon Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional   Chinese   medicine   is   largely   based   on   the   philosophical   concept   that   the   human   body   is   a   small   universe   with   a set   of   complete   and   sophisticated   interconnected   systems,   and   that   those   systems   usually   work   in   balance   to   maintain   the healthy   function   of   the   human   body.   The   balance   of   yin   and   yang   is   considered   with   respect   to   qi   ("breath",   "life   force",   or "spiritual   energy"),   blood,   jing   ("kidney   essence",   including   "semen"),   other   bodily   fluids,   the   Wu   Xing,   emotions,   and   the soul   or   spirit   (shen).   TCM   has   a   unique   model   of   the   body,   notably   concerned   with   the   meridian   system.   Unlike   the   Western anatomical   model   which   divides   the   physical   body   into   parts,   the   Chinese   model   is   more   concerned   with   function.   Thus, the   TCM   spleen   is   not   a   specific   piece   of   flesh,   but   an   aspect   of   function   related   to   transformation   and   transportation within the body, and of the mental functions of thinking and studying. There   are   significant   regional   and   philosophical   differences   between   practitioners   and   schools   which   in   turn   can   lead   to   differences   in practice and theory. Theories invoked to describe the human body in TCM include: Channels, also known as "meridians" Wu Xing Qi Three jiaos also known as the Triple Burner, the Triple Warmer or the Triple Energiser Yin and Yang Zang and Fu The   Yin/Yang   and   five   element   theories   may   be   applied   to   a   variety   of   systems   other   than   the   human   body,   whereas   Zang   Fu   theory, meridian theory and three-jiao (Triple warmer) theories are more specific. There   are   also   separate   models   that   apply   to   specific   pathological   influences,   such   as   the   Four   stages   theory   of   the   progression   of   warm diseases, the Six levels theory of the penetration of cold diseases, and the Eight principles system of disease classification. DIAGNOSTICS METHODS Following   a   macro   philosophy   of   disease,   traditional   Chinese   diagnostics   are   based   on   overall   observation   of   human   symptoms   rather than   "micro"   level   laboratory   tests.   There   are   four   types   of   TCM   diagnostic   methods:   observe,   hear   and   smell,   ask   about   background   and touching   .   The   pulse-reading   component   of   the   touching   examination   is   so   important   that   Chinese   patients   may   refer   to   going   to   the doctor as "Going to have my pulse felt." Traditional   Chinese   medicine   is   considered   to   require   considerable   diagnostic   skill.   Modern   practitioners   often   use   a   traditional   system   in combination with Western methods. Techniques Palpation of the patient's radial artery pulse (pulse diagnosis) in six positions Observations of patient's tongue, voice, hair, face, posture, gait, eyes, ears, vein on index finger of small children Palpation   of   the   patient's   body   (especially   the   abdomen,   chest,   back,   and   lumbar   areas)   for   tenderness   or   comparison   of   relative warmth or coolness of different parts of the body Observation of the patient's various odors Asking the patient about the effects of their problem. Anything else that can be observed without instruments and without harming the patient Asking   detailed   questions   about   their   family,   living   environment,   personal   habits,   food   diet,   emotions,   menstrual   cycle   for   women, child bearing history, sleep, exercise, and anything that may give insight into the balance or imbalance of an individual. METHODS OF TREATMENT The following methods are considered to be part of Chinese medicine: Acupuncture    (from   the   Latin   word   acus,   "needle",   and   pungere,   meaning   "prick")   is   a   technique   in   which   the   practitioner   inserts fine   needles   into   specific   points   on   the   patient's   body.   Usually   about   a   dozen   acupoints   are   needled   in   one   session,   although   the   number of   needles   used   may   range   anywhere   from   just   one   or   two   to   20   or   more.   The   intended   effect   is   to   increase   circulation   and   balance energy (Qi) within the body. Auriculotherapy,  which comes under the heading of Acupuncture and Moxibustion. Chinese   food   therapy:   Dietary   recommendations   are   usually   made   according   to   the   patient's   individual   condition   in   relation   to TCM   theory.   The   "five   flavors"   (an   important   aspect   of   Chinese   herbalism   as   well)   indicate   what   function   various   types   of   food   play   in   the body.   A   balanced   diet,   which   leads   to   health,   is   when   the   five   functional   flavors   are   in   balance.   When   one   is   diseased   (and   therefore unbalanced), certain foods and herbs are prescribed to restore balance to the body. Chinese   herbal   medicine:    In   China,   herbal   medicine   is   considered   as   the   primary   therapeutic   modality   of   internal   medicine.   Of the   approximately   500   Chinese   herbs   that   are   in   use   today,   250   or   so   are   very   commonly   used.   Rather   than   being   prescribed   individually, single   herbs   are   combined   into   formulas   that   are   designed   to   adapt   to   the   specific   needs   of   individual   patients.   A   herbal   formula   can contain   anywhere   from   3   to   25   herbs.   As   with   diet   therapy,   each   herb   has   one   or   more   of   the   five   flavors/functions   and   one   of   five "temperatures"   ("Qi")   (hot,   warm,   neutral,   cool,   cold).   After   the   herbalist   determines   the   energetic   temperature   and   functional   state   of the   patient's   body,   he   or   she   prescribes   a   mixture   of   herbs   tailored   to   balance   disharmony.   One   classic   example   of   Chinese   herbal medicine   is   the   use   of   various   mushrooms,   like   reishi   and   shiitake,   which   are   currently   under   intense   study   by   ethnobotanists   and medical   researchers   for   immune   system   enhancement.   Unlike   Western   herbalism,   Chinese   herbal   medicine   uses   many   animal,   mineral and mineraloid remedies, and also uses more products from marine sources. Cupping:   A   type   of   Chinese   massage,   cupping   consists   of   placing   several   glass   "cups"   (open   spheres)   on   the   body.   A   match   is   lit   and placed   inside   the   cup   and   then   removed   before   placing   the   cup   against   the   skin.   As   the   air   in   the   cup   is   heated,   it   expands,   and   after placing   in   the   skin,   cools   down,   creating   a   lower   pressure   inside   the   cup   that   allows   the   cup   to   stick   to   the   skin   via   suction.   When combined   with   massage   oil,   the   cups   can   be   slid   around   the   back,   offering   what   some   practitioners   think   of   as   a   reverse-pressure massage. Moxibustion:   " Moxa,"   often   used   in   conjunction   with   acupuncture,   consists   in   burning   of   dried   Chinese   mugwort   (Artemisia vulgaris)   on   acupoints.   "Direct   Moxa"   involves   the   pinching   of   clumps   of   the   herb   into   cones   that   are   placed   on   acupoints   and   lit   until warm.   Typically   the   burning   cone   is   removed   before   burning   the   skin   and   is   thought,   after   repeated   use,   to   warm   the   body   and   increase circulation.   Moxa   can   also   be   rolled   into   a   cigar-shaped   tube,   lit,   and   held   over   an   acupuncture   point,   or   rolled   into   a   ball   and   stuck   onto the back end of an inserted needle for warming effect. Physical Qigong exercises such as Tai chi chuan, Qigong and related breathing and meditation exercise. Tui   na   massage:   a   form   of   massage   akin   to   acupressure   (from   which   shiatsu   evolved).   Oriental   massage   is   typically   administered with   the   patient   fully   clothed,   without   the   application   of   grease   or   oils.   Choreography   often   involves   thumb   presses,   rubbing,   percussion, and stretches.   If   you   would   like   additional   information   regarding   our   services   or      to   request   an   appointment,   you   can   contact   us   by   phone   (952 80 53 68) or by email .
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© 2011 - Centro Medicina Natural y Antienvejecimiento - Neural therapy, Homeopathy, Ozone therapy, Carboxytherapy, Mesotherapy Avda. Juan Carlos I, nº 29, portal 5, 2ºB -- 29680, Estepona (Málaga)
hidrocolonterapia, hidroterapia de colon, colonterapia , terapia colonica, limpieza colon, limpieza intestinal, irrigacion colonica,  intestino grueso, delgado, sobrecarga toxica, autointoxicacion, higiene, estreñimiento, diarrea cronica, gastritis, colon
© 2011 - Centro Medicina Natural y Antienvejecimiento Tel: 952 80 53 68      E-mail: info@medicinabiologica.es
La Medicina Tradicional China
Traditional   Chinese   medicine   is   largely   based   on   the philosophical   concept   that   the   human   body   is   a   small universe    with    a    set    of    complete    and    sophisticated interconnected     systems,     and     that     those     systems usually    work    in    balance    to    maintain    the    healthy function   of   the   human   body.   The   balance   of   yin   and yang   is   considered   with   respect   to   qi   ("breath",   "life force",    or    "spiritual    energy"),    blood,    jing    ("kidney essence",    including    "semen"),    other    bodily    fluids,    the    Wu    Xing, emotions,   and   the   soul   or   spirit   (shen).   TCM   has   a   unique   model   of the   body,   notably   concerned   with   the   meridian   system.   Unlike   the Western    anatomical    model    which    divides    the    physical    body    into parts,   the   Chinese   model   is   more   concerned   with   function.   Thus,   the TCM   spleen   is   not   a   specific   piece   of   flesh,   but   an   aspect   of   function related   to   transformation   and   transportation   within   the   body,   and   of the mental functions of thinking and studying. There   are   significant   regional   and   philosophical   differences   between practitioners   and   schools   which   in   turn   can   lead   to   differences   in practice and theory. Theories invoked to describe the human body in TCM include: Channels, also known as "meridians" Wu Xing Qi Three   jiaos   also   known   as   the   Triple   Burner,   the   Triple   Warmer or the Triple Energiser Yin and Yang Zang and Fu The   Yin/Yang   and   five   element   theories   may   be   applied   to   a   variety of   systems   other   than   the   human   body,   whereas   Zang   Fu   theory, meridian   theory   and   three-jiao   (Triple   warmer)   theories   are   more specific. There   are   also   separate   models   that   apply   to   specific   pathological influences,   such   as   the   Four   stages   theory   of   the   progression   of warm    diseases,    the    Six    levels    theory    of    the    penetration    of    cold diseases, and the Eight principles system of disease classification. DIAGNOSTICS METHODS Following     a     macro     philosophy     of     disease,     traditional     Chinese diagnostics   are   based   on   overall   observation   of   human   symptoms rather   than   "micro"   level   laboratory   tests.   There   are   four   types   of TCM    diagnostic    methods:    observe,    hear    and    smell,    ask    about background    and    touching    .    The    pulse-reading    component    of    the touching   examination   is   so   important   that   Chinese   patients   may refer to going to the doctor as "Going to have my pulse felt." Traditional   Chinese   medicine   is   considered   to   require   considerable diagnostic   skill.   Modern   practitioners   often   use   a   traditional   system in combination with Western methods. Techniques Palpation   of   the   patient's   radial   artery   pulse   (pulse   diagnosis) in six positions Observations    of    patient's    tongue,    voice,    hair,    face,    posture, gait, eyes, ears, vein on index finger of small children Palpation   of   the   patient's   body   (especially   the   abdomen,   chest, back,   and   lumbar   areas)   for   tenderness   or   comparison   of   relative warmth or coolness of different parts of the body Observation of the patient's various odors Asking the patient about the effects of their problem. Anything   else   that   can   be   observed   without   instruments   and without harming the patient Asking      detailed      questions      about      their      family,      living environment,   personal   habits,   food   diet,   emotions,   menstrual   cycle for   women,   child   bearing   history,   sleep,   exercise,   and   anything   that may give insight into the balance or imbalance of an individual. METHODS OF TREATMENT The    following    methods    are    considered    to    be    part    of    Chinese medicine: Acupuncture      (from     the     Latin     word     acus,     "needle",     and pungere,   meaning   "prick")   is   a   technique   in   which   the   practitioner inserts    fine    needles    into    specific    points    on    the    patient's    body. Usually    about    a    dozen    acupoints    are    needled    in    one    session, although   the   number   of   needles   used   may   range   anywhere   from just   one   or   two   to   20   or   more.   The   intended   effect   is   to   increase circulation and balance energy (Qi) within the body. Auriculotherapy,      which     comes     under     the     heading     of Acupuncture and Moxibustion. Chinese   food   therapy:   Dietary   recommendations   are   usually made   according   to   the   patient's   individual   condition   in   relation   to TCM    theory.    The    "five    flavors"    (an    important    aspect    of    Chinese herbalism   as   well)   indicate   what   function   various   types   of   food   play in   the   body.   A   balanced   diet,   which   leads   to   health,   is   when   the   five functional    flavors    are    in    balance.    When    one    is    diseased    (and therefore   unbalanced),   certain   foods   and   herbs   are   prescribed   to restore balance to the body. Chinese    herbal    medicine:     In    China,    herbal    medicine    is considered     as     the     primary     therapeutic     modality     of     internal medicine.   Of   the   approximately   500   Chinese   herbs   that   are   in   use today,    250    or    so    are    very    commonly    used.    Rather    than    being prescribed    individually,    single    herbs    are    combined    into    formulas that    are    designed    to    adapt    to    the    specific    needs    of    individual patients.   A   herbal   formula   can   contain   anywhere   from   3   to   25   herbs. As    with    diet    therapy,    each    herb    has    one    or    more    of    the    five flavors/functions   and   one   of   five   "temperatures"   ("Qi")   (hot,   warm, neutral,    cool,    cold).    After    the    herbalist    determines    the    energetic temperature   and   functional   state   of   the   patient's   body,   he   or   she prescribes   a   mixture   of   herbs   tailored   to   balance   disharmony.   One classic   example   of   Chinese   herbal   medicine   is   the   use   of   various mushrooms,    like    reishi    and    shiitake,    which    are    currently    under intense     study     by     ethnobotanists     and     medical     researchers     for immune   system   enhancement.   Unlike   Western   herbalism,   Chinese herbal     medicine     uses     many     animal,     mineral     and     mineraloid remedies, and also uses more products from marine sources. Cupping:    A    type    of    Chinese    massage,    cupping    consists    of placing   several   glass   "cups"   (open   spheres)   on   the   body.   A   match   is lit   and   placed   inside   the   cup   and   then   removed   before   placing   the cup   against   the   skin.   As   the   air   in   the   cup   is   heated,   it   expands,   and after    placing    in    the    skin,    cools    down,    creating    a    lower    pressure inside   the   cup   that   allows   the   cup   to   stick   to   the   skin   via   suction. When   combined   with   massage   oil,   the   cups   can   be   slid   around   the back,    offering    what    some    practitioners    think    of    as    a    reverse- pressure massage. Moxibustion:     " Moxa,"     often     used     in     conjunction     with acupuncture,     consists     in     burning     of     dried     Chinese     mugwort (Artemisia     vulgaris)     on     acupoints.     "Direct     Moxa"     involves     the pinching    of    clumps    of    the    herb    into    cones    that    are    placed    on acupoints   and   lit   until   warm.   Typically   the   burning   cone   is   removed before   burning   the   skin   and   is   thought,   after   repeated   use,   to   warm the   body   and   increase   circulation.   Moxa   can   also   be   rolled   into   a cigar-shaped   tube,   lit,   and   held   over   an   acupuncture   point,   or   rolled into   a   ball   and   stuck   onto   the   back   end   of   an   inserted   needle   for warming effect. Physical   Qigong   exercises   such   as   Tai   chi   chuan,   Qigong   and related breathing and meditation exercise. Tui   na   massage:   a   form   of   massage   akin   to   acupressure   (from which   shiatsu   evolved).   Oriental   massage   is   typically   administered with   the   patient   fully   clothed,   without   the   application   of   grease   or oils.      Choreography      often      involves      thumb      presses,      rubbing, percussion, and stretches. If   you   would   like   additional   information   regarding   our   services or      to   request   an   appointment,   you   can   contact   us   by   phone (952 80 53 68) or by email .
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