Light Therapy System - UVB
© 2011 - Centro Medicina Natural y Antienvejecimiento - Neural therapy, Homeopathy, Ozone therapy, Carboxytherapy, Mesotherapy Avda. Juan Carlos I, nº 29, portal 5, 2ºB -- 29680, Estepona (Málaga)
What is Phototherapy? Phototherapy or light therapy, involves exposing the skin to ultraviolet light on a regular basis and under medical supervision to treat certain medical conditions. Phototherapy is the use of specific wavelengths of light that have been shown to be very effective in the treatment of serious skin diseases like psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis or eczema, generalized itching, lichen planus and other photoresponsive diseases. This light occurs naturally as a component of sunlight and is called ultraviolet light (UVB, UVA) Our medical center has two types of UVB treatment, broad band and narrow band. The major difference between them is that narrow band UVB light bulbs release a smaller range of ultraviolet light. Narrow-band UVB is similar to broad-band UVB in many ways. It has been known for many years that UVB light slows abnormal growth of normal skin cells which is associated with psoriasis. Narrow band UVB (light energy which is emitted in a narrow band portion of the UVB light range, 311-312 nm) is often used to start the repigmenting process for vitiligo and slows growth of psoriasis lesions. Broadband UVB phototherapy (290-320 nm) is another form of phototherapy that is used less frequently in treating eczemas, but may be used in certain circumstances. Phototherapy appears to work in several ways: It directly reduces itch It has an anti-inflammatory effect It increases vitamin D production It appears to help increase bacteria-fighting systems in the skin Is Phototherapy Safe? The safety of ultraviolet phototherapy has been proven for over 100 years. Recent studies show that narrowband UVB lamps (UVB-NB) have virtually NO incidence of causing skin cancer. Ultraviolet phototherapy in general, and particularly narrow band phototherapy light has been proven for long-term use and for treatment of children with minimal side effects. Ultraviolet phototherapy has been shown to be an extremely effective treatment for controlling psoriasis and vitiligo. With guidance from your physician, you will find that using UV light will keep you in almost complete remission with minimum side effects. Is preferable to use narrow band UVB (UVB-NB) light, since there is no need for systemic drugs and treatment times are short. Recent studies show that the use of UVB narrow band light (UVB-NB) results in faster responses and longer remissions than with UVB broadband (UVB-BB). Using narrowband UVB, results are similar to a PUVA treatment without the adverse effects of the drug. UVB-NB is generally considered to be safe for children and lactating mothers. Many practitioners have noted a significant reduction in psoriasis scaling after the first 3 to 6 treatments and improvement may be noted after 6 to 9 treatments. Repigmenting vitiligo is a longer process. Do I need to do anything before or after treatment? You do not need to do anything before or after treatment; however, if you are going to be doing outdoor activities such as playing golf or tennis, boating, or just going to the beach, please apply sunscreen to the exposed areas. We recommend a sunscreen containing titanium or zinc oxide, which will help prevent sunburn and reduce your risk of skin cancer. You may experience “sunburn” like feelings, that is, you may see your skin become pink or red in color, possibly tender, about 12 hours after a treatment in the UVB light box. This may not happen after the first few treatments but it may occur as we continue to increase your dose in order to clear your skin. If you are just pink and have no discomfort, we would like you to come in for your next scheduled treatment. Can phototherapy cause skin cancer? NB-UVB light has not increased the incidence of skin cancer. However, because excessive natural sunlight and tanning bed exposures are associated with skin cancer, we recommend prudent sun exposure with use of sunscreen and avoidance of tanning salons. What reasons might prevent you having phototherapy? If you are unable to attend regularly for treatment: courses of phototherapy are much more effective if administered without interruption. So, attend every appointment and avoid arranging a holiday during a phototherapy programme. If your skin condition is made worse by natural sunlight. If you have xeroderma pigmentosum, Photosensitive dermatoses, such as lupus erythematosus, Pemphigus and bullous pemphigus If you have had skin cancer, especially melanoma If you are taking a medicine which suppresses your immune system (Immunosuppressive medication), such as ciclosporin or methotrexate. If you are taking medicines that make you more sensitive to sunlight. Previous history of intense exposure to solar light If you have reached the maximum number of light treatments in a lifetime. Albinism Previous use of arsenic or exposure to ionizing radiation Past history of cataracts or aphakia Hepatic or renal alterations Do I need to avoid anything whilst having phototherapy? Medicines that make you more sensitive to ultraviolet light. You should inform us of any new medicines prescribed or purchased, including herbal preparations. Additional sun exposure or the use of sunbeds. Excessive quantities of foods such as celery, carrots, figs, citrus fruits, parsnips and parsley; these can make you more sensitive to ultraviolet light. Perfumed products. Creams, ointments and lotions other than moisturisers Short haircuts, as they may result in burning of previously covered skin. What are the potential side effects of phototherapy? The short-term side effects of phototherapy include: Redness and discomfort (sunburn). Dry and itchy skin: UVB light does tend to dry the skin but this can be easily alleviated by applying a moisturizing cream. Folliculitis inflammation of the hair roots may occur. This does not cause discomfort and usually require no treatment or interruption of the UV therapy. A sunlight-induced rash called polymorphic light eruption may develop whilst receiving ultraviolet light. Cold sores if you are prone to these it is advisable to cover the area usually affected with sun block when having ultraviolet treatment. Blisters in areas of psoriasis. Worsening of skin disease. Eye damage: This problem is completely preventable by wearing UV-opaque goggles during the treatment. If you would like additional information regarding our services or to request an appointment, you can contact us by phone (952 80 53 68) or by email .
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© 2011 - Centro Medicina Natural y Antienvejecimiento Tel: 952 80 53 68 E-mail: info@medicinabiologica.es
Light Therapy System - UVB
What is Phototherapy? Phototherapy or light therapy, involves exposing the skin to ultraviolet light on a regular basis and under medical supervision to treat certain medical conditions. Phototherapy is the use of specific wavelengths of light that have been shown to be very effective in the treatment of serious skin diseases like psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis or eczema, generalized itching, lichen planus and other photoresponsive diseases. This light occurs naturally as a component of sunlight and is called ultraviolet light (UVB, UVA) Our medical center has two types of UVB treatment, broad band and narrow band. The major difference between them is that narrow band UVB light bulbs release a smaller range of ultraviolet light. Narrow-band UVB is similar to broad-band UVB in many ways. It has been known for many years that UVB light slows abnormal growth of normal skin cells which is associated with psoriasis. Narrow band UVB (light energy which is emitted in a narrow band portion of the UVB light range, 311-312 nm) is often used to start the repigmenting process for vitiligo and slows growth of psoriasis lesions. Broadband UVB phototherapy (290-320 nm) is another form of phototherapy that is used less frequently in treating eczemas, but may be used in certain circumstances. Phototherapy appears to work in several ways: It directly reduces itch It has an anti-inflammatory effect It increases vitamin D production It appears to help increase bacteria-fighting systems in the skin Is Phototherapy Safe? The safety of ultraviolet phototherapy has been proven for over 100 years. Recent studies show that narrowband UVB lamps (UVB-NB) have virtually NO incidence of causing skin cancer. Ultraviolet phototherapy in general, and particularly narrow band phototherapy light has been proven for long-term use and for treatment of children with minimal side effects. Ultraviolet phototherapy has been shown to be an extremely effective treatment for controlling psoriasis and vitiligo. With guidance from your physician, you will find that using UV light will keep you in almost complete remission with minimum side effects. Is preferable to use narrow band UVB (UVB-NB) light, since there is no need for systemic drugs and treatment times are short. Recent studies show that the use of UVB narrow band light (UVB-NB) results in faster responses and longer remissions than with UVB broadband (UVB-BB). Using narrowband UVB, results are similar to a PUVA treatment without the adverse effects of the drug. UVB-NB is generally considered to be safe for children and lactating mothers. Many practitioners have noted a significant reduction in psoriasis scaling after the first 3 to 6 treatments and improvement may be noted after 6 to 9 treatments. Repigmenting vitiligo is a longer process. Do I need to do anything before or after treatment? You do not need to do anything before or after treatment; however, if you are going to be doing outdoor activities such as playing golf or tennis, boating, or just going to the beach, please apply sunscreen to the exposed areas. We recommend a sunscreen containing titanium or zinc oxide, which will help prevent sunburn and reduce your risk of skin cancer. You may experience “sunburn” like feelings, that is, you may see your skin become pink or red in color, possibly tender, about 12 hours after a treatment in the UVB light box. This may not happen after the first few treatments but it may occur as we continue to increase your dose in order to clear your skin. If you are just pink and have no discomfort, we would like you to come in for your next scheduled treatment. Can phototherapy cause skin cancer? NB-UVB light has not increased the incidence of skin cancer. However, because excessive natural sunlight and tanning bed exposures are associated with skin cancer, we recommend prudent sun exposure with use of sunscreen and avoidance of tanning salons. What reasons might prevent you having phototherapy? If you are unable to attend regularly for treatment: courses of phototherapy are much more effective if administered without interruption. So, attend every appointment and avoid arranging a holiday during a phototherapy programme. If your skin condition is made worse by natural sunlight. If you have xeroderma pigmentosum, Photosensitive dermatoses, such as lupus erythematosus, Pemphigus and bullous pemphigus If you have had skin cáncer, especially melanoma If you are taking a medicine which suppresses your immune system (Immunosuppressive medication), such as ciclosporin or methotrexate. If you are taking medicines that make you more sensitive to sunlight. Previous history of intense exposure to solar light If you have reached the maximum number of light treatments in a lifetime. Albinism Previous use of arsenic or exposure to ionizing radiation Past history of cataracts or aphakia Hepatic or renal alterations Do I need to avoid anything whilst having phototherapy? Medicines that make you more sensitive to ultraviolet light. You should inform us of any new medicines prescribed or purchased, including herbal preparations. Additional sun exposure or the use of sunbeds. Excessive quantities of foods such as celery, carrots, figs, citrus fruits, parsnips and parsley; these can make you more sensitive to ultraviolet light. Perfumed products. Creams, ointments and lotions other than moisturisers Short haircuts, as they may result in burning of previously covered skin. What are the potential side effects of phototherapy? The short-term side effects of phototherapy include: Redness and discomfort (sunburn). Dry and itchy skin: UVB light does tend to dry the skin but this can be easily alleviated by applying a moisturizing cream. Folliculitis inflammation of the hair roots may occur. This does not cause discomfort and usually require no treatment or interruption of the UV therapy. A sunlight-induced rash called polymorphic light eruption may develop whilst receiving ultraviolet light. Cold sores if you are prone to these it is advisable to cover the area usually affected with sun block when having ultraviolet treatment. Blisters in areas of psoriasis. Worsening of skin disease. Eye damage: This problem is completely preventable by wearing UV-opaque goggles during the treatment. If you would like additional information regarding our services or to request an appointment, you can contact us by phone (952 80 53 68) or by email .
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